Monitoring, managing and processing SDI signals efficiently and affordably


With the proliferation of HD, Dual Link and 3G technologies, SDI signal management is now, more than ever, a challenge for broadcast engineers and A/V professionals. They would often like to use affordable HDMI displays for monitoring. They need to distribute signals throughout their facility, which often means video feeds must be amplified to accommodate long cable runs. They may wish to economise on equipment by switching between two sources to one recording device. They may benefit from multiplexing two signals onto a single cable for transport to save wiring. In some facilities, they may even be required to manage 3D workflows.
Accomplishing all these tasks typically necessitates many different items of equipment, such as a variety of mini converters. Not all the products can perform all the functions required and not all can handle all the formats and resolutions that are needed. For example, a multi-purpose unit that does distribution amplification and switching might only support SD-SDI, not HD or 3G. On the other hand, a multi-format device might only perform a single function such as 3D processing. The need to purchase and maintain many different devices can be cost prohibitive and require staff training for each device to ensure proper usage.
To solve this problem, Matrox recently introduced an innovative new mini converter, the MC-100. It provides monitoring, distribution, switching, multiplexing and 3D processing in a single, affordable, easy-to-use device. It also offers maximum versatility with support for a wide range of display resolutions through 3G, Dual Link, HD and SD-SDI.
MC-100 provides a cost-effective solution for monitoring. It allows the user to input a professional-grade 3G, Dual Link, HD, or SD-SDI signal and convert it to a HDMI format so that it can be viewed on an inexpensive HDMI display.
When it comes to signal distribution, the unit can input a single SDI video feed and duplicate it on two SDI outputs. It amplifies the signal to accommodate longer cable runs, maintaining the full SMPTE specification to 300 meters on SD-SDI, 100 meters on HD-SDI and 70 meters on 3G-SDI.
The device can also be used as a true broadcast switcher. The operator can switch between the first and second input to one or all outputs of the device. The switch is glitch free, in accordance with the SMPTE RP-168 specification. In addition, MC-100 is a loss-of-signal switcher. The device can be configured to automatically switch to the second valid input if the first one is lost or becomes invalid. This switch-over is seamless and clean, meaning that downstream devices will keep recording or processing the signal without any interruptions.
As a multiplexer/de-multiplexer, MC-100 can be used to reduce the wiring needed to distribute HD-SDI video by half. It inputs two independent HD-SDI signals and combines them into one 3G transport stream. On the receiving end, a second MC-100 or another SMPTE-425M compatible device de-multiplexes the signal, providing two independent HD-SDI video signals.
For 3D workflows, MC-100 can be used to make multiple adjustments on stereoscopic video feeds in real time. The two SDI inputs are used for the left and right image signals. Horizontal Image Translation (HIT) - sub-pixel convergence and divergence - can be performed on both video inputs. The images can be flipped horizontally and/or vertically, with pixel-based offset controls. Monitoring 3D content can be done on the HDMI or SDI outputs, with several analysis modes such as anaglyph, difference and 50/50. The signal can then be sent on a single SDI cable as a side-by-side or an over/under feed. On HDMI it can be sent in side-by-side, over/under, or frame packing (HDMI 1.4a) mode. MC-100 also features a built-in video frame synchroniser that is useful for 3D production. One of the video inputs is defined as the genlock source, then the unit time base corrects the second video input and outputs the two video streams in sync.
For quick and efficient configuration, every feature of MC-100 is accessible through an on-screen-display, controllable with three hardware buttons directly on the unit. There is no need to programme the device with intricate dip-switch configuration or a computer connection. Available by default on the HDMI output or optionally on both SDI outputs, the on-screen-display gives access to every feature found on the device. User-defined presets can be saved to dip switches for even quicker set-up.
The new Matrox MC-100 mini converter maximises SDI signal management efficiency by consolidating multiple functions into a single device, thereby reducing equipment and training costs. It can be a welcome addition to every video professional’s toolbox.

Tags: iss059 | matrox | mc-100 | smpte rp-168 | smpte-425m | N/A
Contributing Author N/A

Read this article in the tv-bay digital magazine
Article Copyright tv-bay limited. All trademarks recognised.
Reproduction of the content strictly prohibited without written consent.

Related Interviews
  • New X.mio5 12G and Matrox X.mio5 Q25 Cards Showcased at IBC 2018

    New X.mio5 12G and Matrox X.mio5 Q25 Cards Showcased at IBC 2018

  • Matrox Unveils Monarch EDGE 4K Contribution Encoder at IBC 2018

    Matrox Unveils Monarch EDGE 4K Contribution Encoder at IBC 2018

  • Monarch LCS Radar from Matrox at NAB 2018

    Monarch LCS Radar from Matrox at NAB 2018

  • Matrox Monarch LCS Radar shown at BVE 2018

    Matrox Monarch LCS Radar shown at BVE 2018

  • Facebook and YouTube live integration with Monarch HD from Matrox at NAB 2017

    Facebook and YouTube live integration with Monarch HD from Matrox at NAB 2017

  • Uncompressed Video over IP from Matrox at NAB 2017

    Uncompressed Video over IP from Matrox at NAB 2017

  • Quad 4k Capture and Stream with Maevex from Matrox at NAB 2017

    Quad 4k Capture and Stream with Maevex from Matrox at NAB 2017

  • Matrox Monarch LCS at NAB 2016

    Matrox Monarch LCS at NAB 2016

  • Matrox X.mio3 at NAB 2016

    Matrox X.mio3 at NAB 2016

  • Matrox DSX Core at NAB 2016

    Matrox DSX Core at NAB 2016

  • Matrox at IBC 2015

    Matrox at IBC 2015

  • Matrox at IBC 2014

    Matrox at IBC 2014

  • Matrox Monarch HD at NAB 2014

    Matrox Monarch HD at NAB 2014

  • Matrox Mojito at NAB 2014

    Matrox Mojito at NAB 2014

  • Matrox Capture Card at NAB 2014

    Matrox Capture Card at NAB 2014

  • Matrox Monarch HD and VS4 at BVE 2014

    Matrox Monarch HD and VS4 at BVE 2014

  • Matrox Maevex at IBC 2013

    Matrox Maevex at IBC 2013

  • Matrox Avio at IBC 2013

    Matrox Avio at IBC 2013

  • Matrox Video with Monarch HD at IBC 2013

    Matrox Video with Monarch HD at IBC 2013

  • Matrox at BVE 2013

    Matrox at BVE 2013

  • Matrox Video at IBC 2012

    Matrox Video at IBC 2012

  • Matrox Graphics at IBC 2012 Part Three

    Matrox Graphics at IBC 2012 Part Three

  • Matrox Graphics at IBC 2012 Part Two

    Matrox Graphics at IBC 2012 Part Two

  • Matrox Graphics at IBC 2012 Part One

    Matrox Graphics at IBC 2012 Part One

  • Matrox at BVE 2012

    Matrox at BVE 2012

  • Matrox at IBC2011

    Matrox at IBC2011


Related Shows
  • BroadcastShow Christmas Special

    BroadcastShow Christmas Special


Articles
NEP Student Day
KitPlus The world of broadcasting is in constant flux, with undefined boundaries between broadcast, TV, film and interactive media. With a changing consumer demographic now a key influence on the industry, many companies no longer specialise in a single medium, but have had to become adaptable to deliver multiple services through a combination of media.
Tags: iss134 | students | tvfutures | NEP | KitPlus
Contributing Author KitPlus Click to read or download PDF
Keeping it remotely real
Reuben Such Everyone wants to do more with less. Always have, although it could be argued that doing more with more is something to aspire to, not many have that luxury. So let’s stick with the prevailing winds of doing more with less, and not just doing more, but doing it remotely, particularly in terms of production. Remote production, in particular, is getting a lot of attention in the field these days, but not so much in terms of the remote operation of fixed studios.
Tags: iss134 | remote control | IPE | IDS | Reuben Such
Contributing Author Reuben Such Click to read or download PDF
Protecting the continuity of transmission
Lorna Garrett Your viewers love you. You consistently bring them their preferred channels 24/7. They’ve come to rely on you for their viewing pleasure. They never miss cheering on their beloved sports teams. They’re the envy of their friends as they watch live concerts of their favourite bands. They gather the family around and catch up on their must-see shows. They don’t have a bad word to say about you.
Tags: iss134 | garland | gpl | streaming | artel | disaster recovery | Lorna Garrett
Contributing Author Lorna Garrett Click to read or download PDF
The Wireless Way to 4k
JP Delport DTC’s AEON group of products have been specifically designed for the 4K market. We encode with the more efficient HEVC algorithm, which means we are taking a 12G signal and compressing it to a bitrate that can be managed over an RF link. So what makes this a leading idea in the 4K revolution?
Tags: iss134 | wireless | 4k | transmission | JP Delport
Contributing Author JP Delport Click to read or download PDF
What content providers need to know about OTT
Hiren Hindocha As OTT (Over-The-Top) technology has gotten more mature and established robust standards over the years, the concept of OTT monitoring is gaining popularity. With customer expectations soaring, it’s vital for OTT providers to deliver superior quality content. To deliver Quality of Experience (QoE) on par with linear TV broadcast, the entire system, starting from ingest to multi-bitrate encoding to delivery to CDN must be monitored continuously.
Tags: iss134 | ott monitoring | qos | logging | compliance | dash | atsc | cloud | Hiren Hindocha
Contributing Author Hiren Hindocha Click to read or download PDF