The Evolution of Cloud


Micky Edwards TV-Bay Magazine
Read ezine online
with Micky Edwards
Issue 108 - Decmeber 2015

Television was originally created to be a mass communication platform. Yet, over the last few years, it is becoming increasingly hyperlocal. There are several reasons the television industry is transitioning from a broadcast to narrowcast schematic. One is monetization. According to Borrell Associates, local advertising is a $115 billion market, and estimates show that digital spending in 2015 will account for 42 percent of all advertising within the local space. Thats a lot of revenue that broadcasters limited to a single geographic region could potentially miss out on.

In addition, the trend towards hyperlocalization enables broadcasters to offer targeted content and advertisements, especially with the growing demand for a multiscreen TV experience - from TV sets to PCs, smartphones, and tablets. In its Global Entertainment and Media Outlook for 2013-17 research report, PriceWaterhouseCoopers (PwC) has predicted that the growth in the OTT market is likely to touch $17.44 billion by 2017 as streaming and Internet-to-TV services become more prevalent. In the same report, PwC highlights that homes will spend increasing amounts on OTT, and purchases and subscriptions made through the TV, amounting to $1.28 billion in 2017. As such, the hyperlocal content and advertising segment will unfold at a rapid pace in the coming months.

Hyperlocalization also allows broadcasters to meet broadcast regulations and content rights requirements that are specific to a particular country. For instance, some countries permit the advertising of alcohol and some do not. TV networks need an easy and affordable way to replace those ads on a common feed.

The challenge is how to distribute hyperlocal TV across multiple platforms in the most efficient and cost-effective means possible. Traditional satellite and fiber-based models are too expensive for hyperlocalization due to high CAPEX costs which, in turn, put pressure on ROI expectations. This article will explain why broadcasters are turning to the cloud to deliver hyperlocal TV, highlighting the specific benefits and applications.

Benefits of Using Cloud for
Hyperlocal TV

Leveraging the cloud, broadcasters can gain increased scalability, streamline the distribution of television content, and dramatically reduce infrastructure expenses. Lets take a look at three specific workflow areas where broadcasters are finding cloud infrastructure to be beneficial for hyperlocal TV.

First and foremost, the cloud is a great way to reduce storage costs. Whenever a broadcaster decides to start delivering hyperlocal playout, they can expect storage costs to rise in parallel with the additional assets theyll be distributing. By storing assets on the cloud, broadcasters do not need to make a large capital investment in data centers or tape archives. They can pay as they grow.

From a playout perspective, a cloud-based infrastructure provides broadcasters with more flexibility when it comes to expanding into noncontiguous geographies. For example, lets say that a broadcaster in the UK wants to cater to audiences in Germany, the Middle East, Australia, and Canada. The TV network would have to build a satellite infrastructure that covers each continent. Given the cost of satellite-based content delivery, thats quite an expensive undertaking. Whats more, a separate satellite feed would be required to expand into each additional market in other geographies in the future. With a cloud-based infrastructure, broadcasters can push their entire content just once, and then start delivering content to regions of their choice in an easy and affordable manner. The regions can be as far apart as Australia, the UK, and Canada. In this case, the broadcaster can even hyperlocalize content specific to each region. Ultimately, a cloud-based playout approach provides opportunity for hyperlocal playout and monetizes content at a reduced cost.

The broadcast community is also starting to use the cloud as a reliable solution for disaster recovery. They can now address feed disruption for any duration in a localized manner. For those who are leveraging satellite or fiber for their primary channel feed, running the secondary and tertiary feeds on the cloud as parallel feeds can dramatically reduce capital expenditures. For disaster recovery, the cloud offers reliability, manageability, and security without compromising on broadcast quality.

Future Outlook for Cloud-Based Delivery

The concept of television is evolving rapidly, as the demand for personalization and targeted content continues to grow, both from a consumption and advertising perspective. The cloud provides broadcasters with a flexible, scalable, and cost-effective way to deliver hyperlocal content and gain insight into a users viewing habits, driving monetization.

As far as the rate of adoption for cloud-based architecture, small and large TV networks acknowledge that the cloud is the future. With an eye to lowering CAPEX and OPEX to manage their current feeds and to support expansion plans, network executives are banking heavily on cloud and next generation playout platforms. Many TV networks have already initiated the transition to cloud-based broadcast to benefit from hyperlocalization advantages. The smaller TV networks are also aggressively adopting cloud technologies to save on capital investment, build efficiencies, and capture audience and advertising share in a competitive marketplace.

In the future, as the television market continues to focus on multiscreen distribution and personalization of content, the majority of broadcasters will transition to a cloud-based architecture for storage, content delivery, and disaster recovery.


Tags: amagi | iss108 | cloud | hyperlocal | Micky Edwards
Contributing Author Micky Edwards

Read this article in the tv-bay digital magazine
Article Copyright tv-bay limited. All trademarks recognised.
Reproduction of the content strictly prohibited without written consent.

Related Interviews
  • The Teracue Application Cloud show at IBC 2018 (German version)

    The Teracue Application Cloud show at IBC 2018 (German version)

  • The Teracue Application Cloud show at IBC 2018

    The Teracue Application Cloud show at IBC 2018

  • Blue Lucy with BLAM3 and their very own cloud at IBC 2018

    Blue Lucy with BLAM3 and their very own cloud at IBC 2018

  • Playbox Cloud Air at IBC 2107

    Playbox Cloud Air at IBC 2107

  • Cloud Media Management with Medway from Marquis Broadcast at IBC 2017

    Cloud Media Management with Medway from Marquis Broadcast at IBC 2017

  • Hybrid Cloud Media Aggregation from Cantemo at NAB 2017

    Hybrid Cloud Media Aggregation from Cantemo at NAB 2017

  • Elemental Technologies cloud innovations at NAB 2016

    Elemental Technologies cloud innovations at NAB 2016

  • FORSCENE Cloud Editing at NAB 2015

    FORSCENE Cloud Editing at NAB 2015

  • ERA - Cloud Services - at BVE 2015

    ERA - Cloud Services - at BVE 2015

  • Aframe Cloud Video at IBC 2013

    Aframe Cloud Video at IBC 2013

  • Haivision: Video Cloud at NAB 2013

    Haivision: Video Cloud at NAB 2013

  • Be More with Clear from Prime Focus Technologies at NAB 2017

    Be More with Clear from Prime Focus Technologies at NAB 2017

  • Object Based Storage Solutions from Object Matrix at NAB 2017

    Object Based Storage Solutions from Object Matrix at NAB 2017

  • New CEO and news update from TMD at NAB 2017

    New CEO and news update from TMD at NAB 2017

  • Prime Focus Technologies at IBC 2016

    Prime Focus Technologies at IBC 2016

  • Prime Focus Technologies at NAB 2016

    Prime Focus Technologies at NAB 2016

  • Playbox at IBC 2015

    Playbox at IBC 2015

  • ERA - Adobe Anywhere - at BVE 2015

    ERA - Adobe Anywhere - at BVE 2015

  • Grass Valley at BVE 2015

    Grass Valley at BVE 2015

  • NETIA at BVE 2015

    NETIA at BVE 2015

  • Forscene at IBC 2014

    Forscene at IBC 2014

  • Thomson Video Networks at IBC 2014

    Thomson Video Networks at IBC 2014

  • Comigo at IBC 2014

    Comigo at IBC 2014

  • ChyronHego Metacast at IBC 2014

    ChyronHego Metacast at IBC 2014

  • Elemental Technologies Software-Defined Video at NAB 2014

    Elemental Technologies Software-Defined Video at NAB 2014

  • Elemental Technologies HEVC solutions at NAB 2014

    Elemental Technologies HEVC solutions at NAB 2014

  • Elemental Technologies Multiscreen Solutions at NAB 2014

    Elemental Technologies Multiscreen Solutions at NAB 2014

  • ERA at BVE 2014

    ERA at BVE 2014

  • ERA Avere at BVE 2014

    ERA Avere at BVE 2014

  • Forbidden Technologies FORscene at BVE 2014

    Forbidden Technologies FORscene at BVE 2014

  • Forbidden Technologies FORscene App at BVE 2014

    Forbidden Technologies FORscene App at BVE 2014

  • Haivision on BroadcastShow LIVE at IBC 2013

    Haivision on BroadcastShow LIVE at IBC 2013

  • Front Porch Digital on BroadcastShow LIVE at IBC 2013

    Front Porch Digital on BroadcastShow LIVE at IBC 2013

  • Forbidden Technologies on BroadcastShow LIVE at IBC 2013

    Forbidden Technologies on BroadcastShow LIVE at IBC 2013

  • Cambridge Imaging Systems on BroadcastShow LIVE at IBC 2013

    Cambridge Imaging Systems on BroadcastShow LIVE at IBC 2013

  • Digital Vision on BroadcastShow LIVE at IBC 2013

    Digital Vision on BroadcastShow LIVE at IBC 2013

  • Haivision live encoding HEVC at IBC 2013

    Haivision live encoding HEVC at IBC 2013

  • Tedial at NAB 2013

    Tedial at NAB 2013

  • Haivision at NAB 2012

    Haivision at NAB 2012

  • Chyron at NAB 2012

    Chyron at NAB 2012

  • TSL at BVE 2012

    TSL at BVE 2012


Related Shows
  • Den Lennie and Larry Jordan - Cloud Editing BVE 2015

    Den Lennie and Larry Jordan - Cloud Editing BVE 2015


Articles
An Epiphany Moment
Peter Savage 2 I had been negotiating the sale of my company and had reached the really hard end of the bargain. We were close to agreeing the final sum after a lot of too-much-give-and-not-enough-take negotiation. The solicitors were calling me, keen for a deal. It had come down to one sticking point and, in my hard ball “I am the Wolf of Wall Street” guise, I wasn’t going to let it go. It would make a value difference of 1.5% on the total outcome. Not much, you might think, but I had already nearly fallen out with the solicitors over their fees and I was giving my advisors an extremely hard time because the corporate adviser couldn’t see how I had already given more than an inch and the buyers were taking more than a mile. I was not going to let them win.
Tags: iss134 | azule | finance | Peter Savage 2
Contributing Author Peter Savage 2 Click to read or download PDF
Using Wireless Transmission
Jeremy Benning Wireless acquisition is a staple of live sports, entertainment and reality shows where cable free capture permits shots not previously possible, for health and safety reasons, and gives the camera-operator greater artistic licence to roam. The same is increasingly true of narrative drama where cinematographers are keen to work handheld or Steadicam where that helps tell the story. Any equipment which frees their movement and time by being lighter, easier to use and reliable in performance is going to tick a lot of boxes.
Tags: iss134 | wireless | 4k | transmission | Jeremy Benning
Contributing Author Jeremy Benning Click to read or download PDF
Shedding Light on the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4k BMCPP4K
Garth de Bruno Austin “What is it about light that has us craving it?” Is the question asked in the opening seconds of Garth de Bruno Austin’s latest short, The Colour of Light. Exploring this natural, human need as well as our innate desire to control it, Garth’s film showcases everyday people going about their lives in differing degrees of luminance, whether that be an artificial streetlight or a natural morning sunrise.
Tags: iss134 | blackmagic | cinema camera | 4k | cpp4k | Garth de Bruno Austin
Contributing Author Garth de Bruno Austin Click to read or download PDF
The brave new world of software based production
Boromy Ung In today’s rapidly evolving broadcast industry, the only constant media organizations can truly count on is change — and the need to adapt as rapidly and cost-effectively as possible. One of the biggest agents of change is the IP revolution, driving broadcasters to migrate their operations to all-software solutions running on commodity, IT-based technologies.
Tags: iss134 | chyronhego | graphics | sports | ott | Boromy Ung
Contributing Author Boromy Ung Click to read or download PDF
Sony HDC-4800 Review
Andy McKenzie First announced at NAB 2016, the Sony HDC-4800 is a studio camera system capable of shooting 4K/UHD at up to 8x or full HD at up to 16x. With a price point upwards of £250,000 it is a very high-end product with a wide feature set. In Sony's own words, "This is the future of live production, designed to satisfy the storytelling aspect of modern sports production.” Deliveries began in mid 2017 and, after careful preliminary evaluation, we invested in several systems for our hire fleet ahead of the FIFA World Cup in Russia.
Tags: iss134 | review | hdc-4800 | sony | finepoint | Andy McKenzie
Contributing Author Andy McKenzie Click to read or download PDF