The Next Generation of Image Aqisition for Live Broadcast


Klaus Weber TV-Bay Magazine
Read ezine online
by Klaus Weber
Issue 86 - February 2014
Today, there are many discussions focused on next generation broadcast formats. This is mainly driven by the fact that the consumer industry has already launched 4K (UHD) TV sets. Beside the question is the market ready to accept a new broadcast format? One question still remains: what is the best solution for the next generation broadcast format? Is it just the double pixel count in horizontal and vertical direction? Will a higher frame rate and/or a higher dynamic range and extended color range provide viewers a higher value? Will all these improvements need to be included in a next generation broadcast format? The answer will likely depend on the type of production and content delivery.

On the acquisition side, there are many physical limitations, and as a result more compromises will need to be made. For example, to keep the sensitivity and the dynamic range at todays levels, the pixel size cannot be reduced from the current 5m. However, if a four-times higher pixel count is requiredthe pixels would need to be four-times smaller to fit the same size imager. This will have a direct impact on sensitivity and dynamic range and with todays technology this is not a solution. If the pixel size will be kept, an imager with four-times more pixels will need to be four-times larger, which means instead of todays 2/3 size, the imagers would come close in size to the Super35 image format. But for the Super35 format, no lens exists to support a three imager solution based on a prism beam splitter, because all the available lenses which support larger imager size have been developed for still cameras and film camera applications. Plus, the relatively short flange-back of these lenses does not allow the addition of a prism beam splitter in-between the lens mount and the camera imagers.

This will therefore only allow single imager solutions with a color pattern filter in front of the imager such as a Bayer pattern filter. The higher total pixel count will need to be divided into the three primary colors and then a higher resolution can be achieved by some image processing techniques which partly estimate where an object in the image might have been.
These solutions have some severe side effects and are not always predictableleaving all sorts of challenges for live production. In addition, there are no large zoom range lenses available for these larger sized imagers because its not possible to build them in a reasonable size and for an acceptable cost. And with a larger sized imager comes the larger focal length needed for the same angle of view, which translates into a shorter depth of field. This is often required with film productions, but with live productions the reduced depth of field leads to a much more difficult focus setting.

Furthermore, any new format will be a progressive format and CCD imagers do not offer an acceptable performance level. Today, CCD-based cameras achieve an acceptable level of performance only in the interlaced formats where they add the signal charges of two adjacent pixels together doubling the sensitivity and the dynamic range. CCDs operating in a progressive format offer only half the sensitivity and dynamic range as in the interlaced formats. The LDX Series¢ of advanced imaging cameras from Grass Valley® operate with FT CMOS imagers, which always work in a progressive format with the same sensitivity and dynamic range found between both interlaced and progressive formats.

The high performance of the FT CMOS imagers in combination with the global shutter behavior of the Xensium-FT imagers offer a perfect basis for the next generation broadcast formats. This provides the potential for high-speed operation, and high dynamic range with a higher resolution that provides a new user experience especially for all live broadcast applications.

The LDX Series and LDX Compact¢ series of cameras offer more.

With the wide range of 3G transmission solutions, the unique XCU concept and eLicense upgrade system, they already represent the most flexible and powerful camera system on the market and in addition they are the perfect basis for future developments in many directions.

The LDX Series offer the perfect solution for the next generation image acquisition for live broadcast.


Tags: iss086 | Klaus Weber | Grass Valley | The LDX Series | LDX Compact | FT CMOS imagers | Xensium-FT imagers | Klaus Weber
Contributing Author Klaus Weber

Read this article in the tv-bay digital magazine
Article Copyright tv-bay limited. All trademarks recognised.
Reproduction of the content strictly prohibited without written consent.

Related Interviews
  • Grass Valley at BVE 2013

    Grass Valley at BVE 2013

  • Grass Valley at BVE 2015

    Grass Valley at BVE 2015

  • Grass Valley at BVE 2014

    Grass Valley at BVE 2014

  • Grass Valley at NAB 2012

    Grass Valley at NAB 2012

  • Grass Valley at IBC2011

    Grass Valley at IBC2011


Articles
Switching to Internet Based Distribution
Chris Clark

"An IP status check for the broadcast industry", "Resistance is futile", "IP points the way forward for the broadcast industry"...

Yes, we've read the headlines too. But rather than force you into submission, scare you, or leave you feeling like you have no other choice, we want to give you the information that helps you to make a sensible decision about Internet-based distribution.

So what’s stopping you from making the switch right now?

Tags: iss135 | ip | internet | distribution | cerberus | Chris Clark
Contributing Author Chris Clark Click to read or download PDF
21st Century Technology for 20th Century Content
James Hall A big challenge facing owners of legacy content is rationalising and archiving their tape and film-based media in cost effective and efficient ways, whilst also adding value. Normally the result of this is to find a low cost means of digitising the content – usually leaving them with a bunch of assets on HDD. But then what? How can content owners have their cake and eat it?
Tags: iss135 | legacy | digitising | digitizing | archive | James Hall
Contributing Author James Hall Click to read or download PDF
Future proofing post production storage
Josh Goldenhar Advancements in NVMe (Non-Volatile Memory Express), the storage protocol designed for flash, are revolutionising data storage. According to G2M Research, the NVMe market will grow to $60 billion by 2021, with 70 percent of all-flash arrays being based on the protocol by 2020. NVMe, acting like steroids for flash-based storage infrastructures, dynamically and dramatically accelerates data delivery.
Tags: iss135 | nvme | sas | sata | it | storage | post production | Josh Goldenhar
Contributing Author Josh Goldenhar Click to read or download PDF
Your two week editing future
Alex Macleod

So here we are - January again! Usually a good time to reflect on the year just gone by, and a good time to look forward to the coming months as the new year begins.

When I was reflecting on my 2018, and when thinking about what to write for my first article for Kit Plus - I kept coming back to one theme - organisation.

Tags: iss135 | editing | mediacity training | premiere pro | dit | Alex Macleod
Contributing Author Alex Macleod Click to read or download PDF
Test, Measurement and Standards
Alan Wheable The Alliance for IP Media Solutions (AIMS), is a non-profit trade alliance that fosters the adoption of one set of common, ubiquitous, standards-based protocols for interoperability over IP in the media and entertainment, and professional audio/video industries.
Tags: iss135 | omnitek | aims | SNMP | hdr | ai | Alan Wheable
Contributing Author Alan Wheable Click to read or download PDF