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AN EPIC JOURNEY FOR BROADCAST EQUIPMENT With the abundance of international sporting events taking place this summer, broadcast technologies and logistics are being put to the test across the board. by Raymond Burns B eyond the typical coordination and on site expertise required for broadcasts, many companies face not only longer engagements but aggressive turnaround times and long travel distances between each event. This summer, Bexel, a unit of the Vitec Group’s Services Division and a leading worldwide provider of broadcast services and solutions, gave us an inside look at the journey of its gear as the company successfully outfitted major broadcasters with equipment and engineering support during the 2012 UEFA European Football Championship, Olympic Games and US Open—totaling more than 12,000 miles in about three months. “Every two years we anticipate the challenges and logistics required for the Olympic Games,” says Joe Wire, vice president Bexel Global Enterprise Accounts. “This year posed a unique test for us, as the games took place directly in between the Euro Cup in Warsaw, Poland, and the US Open in Queens, New York. Not only did we have to take staffing into consideration, but also equipment, as each production required unique solutions.” Throughout the course of the year, Bexel made considerable investments in a range of broadcast technologies. “We know that our clients expect turnkey solutions, so as we built up to the summer events, we increased our inventory substantially—from cameras and lenses to servers, switchers and audio monitoring,” says Tom Dickinson, chief technology officer, Bexel. While Bexel was ultimately charged with coordinating three different broadcast events, its expertise lies in scalable solutions. “Using the same core infrastructure for all three events, we were able to utilize similar equipment across all of them and succeed,” says Wire. Included in the scalable flypacks that made the journey across Europe and the U.S. were Evertz EQX, EMR and Xenon routers, Sony HDC-2500 cameras and the EVS XT3 video servers. The Evertz EQX and EMR routers originally made their flypack debut during last year’s US Open and were selected again this year, as the routers are scalable to meet the various different complexities of the shows with regards to inputs, type of signals (50hz vs. 60hz and multiple HD formats) and flexible programming. The Sony HDC-2500 cameras were a part of the flypacks for the Olympics as well as the US Open, as the camera is the first to offer 1080p as a standard feature, capturing incredible images for Bexel clients. What’s more, the EVS XT3 six-channel production servers with 900GB drives were provided to give Bexel and its clients the most robust server technology available. They also provided a backbone of the technical infrastructure to perform at its highest capability allowing Bexel clients to capture, edit, playback and export the media in a seamless fashion. The EVS internal IT infrastructure allows Bexel to create a diverse production computer network with 68 | TV-BAY MAGAZINE