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Camera Innovations! #Smart Best Sequel by Will Strauss I BC 2012 – ‘Dam, that was a good show Fresh from another trip to Amsterdam, Will Strauss picks his ‘best in show’ camera innovations from IBC. I know, I know. It’s October and the chances are that you’ve already had your fill of ‘round-ups’, ‘reviews’ and ‘what I saw in Amsterdam’ type articles. But with so much stuff to choose from at the show, hopefully you’ll indulge me as I run through some of the things that caught my eye at IBC 2012. Well, I particularly enjoyed the stroopwafels and the broodje kroket (having never tried either Dutch delicacy in any of my previous 12 visits to IBC) but I also found plenty of exciting new kit. Which is handy as this article would have been a bit dull if I hadn’t. With so much to consider (and so little time to consider it) I’ve opted to highlight some of the camera innovations on show, mainly because there were several unique advances in that field but also because 1000 words only gets you so far when there are 11 halls to choose from. So, without further ado, here are my unofficial camera award winners from IBC. Assuming you haven’t been living in a cave you’ll have heard that Blackmagic Design have a Cinema Camera in the offing. Well, before that much anticipated device has even hit the streets, the company has announced that a Micro Four Thirds (MFT) model will also be made available. It won’t have lens control but it will work with any manual MFT lens or PL mount lenses (assuming you have an adaptor). It’s a clever move as the 2.5k sensor is pretty much perfectly matched to MFT. Oh, and to avoid any confusion, the original Cinema Camera is being renamed as the Cinema Camera EF while the new model will be called the Cinema Camera MFT. So now you know. BMD Cinema Camera MTF #IBC 2012 #Progress #Quality The viewers choice award Sony’s PMW-200, described by some as an “EX1 on steroids”, is a full HD 50Mb/s 4:2:2 camcorder that records to SxS cards using three ½-inch ExmorCMOS sensors. Importantly, the codec is the same as shoulder mounted beasts like the PDW- 36 | TV-BAY MAGAZINE 700 or the F800 meaning that it complies with the exacting EBU standards for long-form HD television programmes (which the EX1 did not unless you added an external recorder). As a result, it was probably the most talked about camera at IBC. OK, so the title is a bit of a misnomer but as an “entry-level” version of the popular C300, Canon’s C100 does offer a lot of potential. Setting you back just £5k (ish), it’s a serious competitor to Sony’s FS100 (which is roughly the same price). It has the same pistol side grip, viewfinder and LCD screen as the C300 but with a Super 35mm CMOS Sensor that runs at 24, 25, 30, 50i and 60i frames per second at 1920 x 1080 resolution. Like the FS100 it uses H.264 in an AVCHD wrapper but unlike the FS100 it has built-in glass ND filters, which is a bonus. Canon C100 Sony PMW-200 Most promising Newcomer