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consider your room carefully, and how your monitors have been set up. “Number One: Broad Frequency Response.” So how do I set my monitors up correctly?! It’s relatively easy to make a speaker that tweets all the way up to 20kHz, but physical cabinet size is one of the primary factors that determine deep bass response. Genelec make their cabinets from aluminium which is both light and stiff, and which can be made thinner than would be possible with MDF (the walls of Genelec 8000 speakers are only 4mm thick, but they are tough hombres). This means you can have a large internal volume in a small cabinet, meaning surprising bass response despite appearances. There is also an exit port for a long and efficient internal bass reflex tube system, which contributes to the bass response. Couple a pair of Genelec 8020’s with a 7050 sub, and you can get 25kHz-20kHz system for a street price less than £1500 (that’s rather good!). If you have a Genelec 8000 range speaker, use those switches round the back to control bass and high frequency response. Reducing the bass output when your monitors are placed close to dense walls and corners is essential. If you find yourself setting up for a quick job outside of a treated space, engage the high frequency pad to tame the upper regions. There’s much more to consider - acoustics is a monster of a subject. While some rooms are better than others, certain issues appear in every room and every speaker placement. Genelec publish a document called the ‘Monitor Setup Guide’ detailing the most common problems and how to set up your monitors to best counteract them - it’s a free PDF on their site, and although aimed at the 8000 range, is actually tremendously useful information no matter what speakers you have, so please take a look. So how does a speaker counteract these acoustic problems you’ve been talking about, in terms of design? No speaker will completely replace the need for a sensible choice of room, base-level acoustic treatment, and the talent of a mix engineer who knows their craft and mixes while taking into account the weaknesses in their environment. With that said however...within the bounds of analogue design, we do think Genelec have put together a special system. And if you consider the 8200 range DSP-systems, their ability to automatically compensate for bass problems is very advanced indeed. Let’s go back to those points in question two and see how Genelec deal with these design concerns. ASK OUR EXPERTS “Number Two: Flat Frequency Response.” & “Number Three: Accuracy and Soundstage.” “Number Four: Reliability.” In the professional field monitors are relied on in order to deliver work on time, breakage through accidentally high volumes or wild feedback is simply unacceptable. The 8000 range all feature active protection circuitry to protect the drivers from damage caused by errant frequencies and accidental volume boosts. In practical terms this means 8000 range monitors can be relied on for pro work. This isn’t lip service, Genelec give an extended warranty on registration of 8000 Series models to provide a total of four years cover. There’s a lot of technology at play here, but the net result is a speaker which is easy to set up, reliable, forgiving and true. It’s not unusual for Genelec (and for us here in the UK servicing department) to receive 25 year old speakers for repair - planned obsolescence is not part of their plan. And we think this is why the 8000 range continues to endure - Genelec got it right. The curved 8000 range cabinet is called the minimum diffraction enclosure. On boxy speakers with sharp edges, diffraction is a phenomenon that causes the edges themselves to act not unlike “phantom tweeters”. Sound is radiated in multiple directions unpredictably, causing comb filtering and other interactions which end up in a bumpy and unpredictable frequency response. The curved shape of the Genelec 8000 range hugely minimises this effect. The directivity control waveguide, which is Genelec’s name for the sculpted exit port around the tweeter, also contributes to a flattened frequency response, clearly defined soundstage and an extremely wide sweet spot. If you happen to demo a set - Notice how far off-axis you can go from the listening position and not experience a profound frequency roll-off. For folks moving about a large mixing console and still wanting to make informed mix decisions, this can be a real blessing. POST YOUR QUESTION ONLINE: Search ‘tvbay’ Tel. +44 (0)1635 237 237 Email. questions@tv-bay.com TV-BAY MAGAZINE | 41 TV-BAY071NOV12.indd 41 06/11/2012 18:09