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Video monitoring essentials list. Marshall have really perfected the options here with a sharp and bright waveform - basic but important. The only way to absolutely guarantee your exposure is to use a waveform. I’ve recently begun colour grading seriously and you rely on an RGB waveform parade to manage consistency and so to maintain the detail in your highlights. On location using a waveform will dramatically improve your chances of gaining a good digital negative. What I like about the Marshall waveform is that when you go over 100% you can set a RED marker so when working quickly you can have that real security and peace of mind that you’re exposure will be spot on. It’s like an early warning system The advanced options are very very cool too. You can set clipping points for both highlight and shadow clip and set a colour to show when you hit each point. This means while you are busy lighting and assessing the many elements of your frame you are able to quickly see a confidence colour show up if you are entering the range of clip that you have set. I very much like this function as I have two ways for immediately referencing my exposure. False Colour This is admittedly only something I’ve started using recently. I have Robin Schmidt (@DirSchmidt) to thank for introducing me to this very cool feature. The False Colour filter is used to aid in the setting of camera exposure. As the camera iris is adjusted, elements of the image will change colour based on the luminance or brightness values. This enables proper exposure to be achieved without the use of costly or complicated external test equipment. To best utilise this feature, you must understand the colour chart and have a basic understanding of camera exposure. Normally, when shooting subjects like people, it is common practice to set exposure of faces to the equivalent of approximately 56 IRE. The False Colour filter will show this area as the colour PINK on the monitor. Therefore, as you increase exposure (open the iris), your subject will change colour as indicated on the chart: PINK, then GREY, then a few shades of YELLOW. Overexposed subjects (above 101 IRE) on the monitor will be shown as RED. In addition, underexposed subjects will show as DEEP-BLUE to DARK-BLUE, with clipped-blacks indicated with a FUCHSIA-like colour. Lastly, the colour GREEN is used to indicate elements of the image that are approximately 45 IRE. This represents a “neutral” or “mid-level” exposure commonly used for objects (not people). Overall summary I’m a fan of this monitor. It’s sharp, accurate, modular and lightweight. It packs a lot of punch and is totally reliable when judging exposure on set. Moreover the colour accuracy is spot on, something that is not as common as you might think in working with video monitors. If you’re really serious about colour and exposure then check out the range from Marshall - you won’t be disappointed. About Den Lennie Den Lennie is a DP and one of the world’s leading coaches on the new wave of digital film making. He runs an online film school at fstopacademy.com and specialises in small group film making workshops all over the world. Den has worked in the industry for over 20 years and in every major TV genre  conceivable, including Music, Documentary,Travel, Sport, Factual & Entertainment. He has worked as an Lighting Cameraman, Director of Photography, Producer, Director, Editor and Colourist  and has first-hand experience of every part of the industry and how to create stand – out work. Den is a Sony Independent Certified Expert, A Tiffen Image Maker and in 2012 was the first official global ambassador for Carl Zeiss Lenses. 52 | TV-BAY MAGAZINE TV-BAY071NOV12.indd 52 06/11/2012 18:10