TV-BAY January 2013

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It offers a lot of features and incredible value, so what’s the downside? Certainly there’s a lack of analogue and audio inputs, but the UltraStudio Pro, still at little more than £500 certainly solves the issue. Secondly the extreme performance of the device means it needs the right platform to run from, so it’s best to buy from an established and knowledgeable reseller who can give the best advice. Grass Valley’s mobile editing solution – Storm Mobile – offers similar levels of performance and enjoys rock solid stability by being limited to a Windows environment and to a single editing programme, Edius. Like the UltraStudio Pro, it features a full range of inputs and outputs and 10-bit capture but has the advantage that it can play out an HD picture via HDMI and an SD picture through the analogue connections, all at the same time. Arguably its ExpressCard/34 card also delivers a more robust connection to the laptop than a USB cable. Monitoring the action In the studio, many use an LCD panel or professional plasma for monitoring. For field editing work, a 15” display is a minimum requirement and a grade 2 reference monitor is preferred to give a very accurate representation of colours. Panasonic’s 17” BT-LH1760 fits the bill with its SDI input. It’s tough, made with an aluminium die-cast frame and optional protective panel. It has low power consumption (half that of its predecessor) and handily takes AC/DC power. And the all-important performance? Its three-dimensional LUT is said to offer virtually the same colour reproduction as CRTs: it’s reassuringly accurate. The Panasonic device has a huge range of features to ensure that fast action is rendered without blur, and that the colours are accurate enough for cinematic monitoring or for grading professionals. system is essential. It’s a safeguard that must not be overlooked. At a lower price point, Datavideo’s new TLM-170P is an all-purpose 1080p native panel that can be employed as a continuous use production monitor and as a post production display. The all-round performance that this type of screen offers flexible inputs, manual calibration, switchable aspect ratios and a versatile stand suited to rack or desktop use. For HD editors who want to monitor their work for colour accuracy and encoding errors, it’s a good choice compared with a domestic model that may be designed to correct certain video signal faults and picture inaccuracies. Shared editing Be safe There’s a maxim we’ve all heard: “if you haven’t got it twice you haven’t got it”. Files imported onto a hard drive in the field are simply not safe. Data replication onto a secondary storage Sonnet’s F2 and F3 drives both offer RAID protection so that single disk failure (caused by over-heating or being dropped) does not necessarily mean lost data. Both appliances are encased in a rugged metal shell and deliver high data rates that can sustain multi-stream HD editing. Capacities range from 1TB to 6TB enabling hours of content to be safely stored. Despite their storage space, both are light and portable, the F2 also benefiting from support for battery power. With the above in place, field editing can now very nearly match studio post production for speed, creativity, accuracy and reliability. Until recently, however, there was one gap: collaborative editing was only for workgroups based in office facilities. Not now. GB Labs’ RAID 6 Mini Space is no heavier than a computer workstation and is designed to accompany HD editors into the field. Its 4.8TB capacity can be shared by multiple laptop users, each connecting to the system by a simple Ethernet cable. Supporting up-to 400MB/s, it can serve multiple simultaneous 1080 streams, enabling faster and more creative post production. It’s the final piece of the jigsaw that makes location editing truly come of age. TV-BAY MAGAZINE | 49 TV-BA073JAN13.indd 49 11/01/2013 14:17