TV-BAY January 2013

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at the same time – not always what you want (and can be turned off) but this can save you from copying and pasting filters in FCP. Showing standard 3way colour corrector panel in FCP with the ‘limit effect’ options being used to select blue eyes for Rutger hauler. Davinci start up splash. Davinci Resolve colour panel using a ‘power curve’ that was very quickly tracked to follow the contour of the mountain as the shot pans down. control otherwise its lift, gamma and gain controls instead with colour wheels or an alternative bars interface. Resolve adds a curves palette and if you’re familiar with using curves in Adobe Photoshop then you will be able to quickly use these to manipulate your primary grade and add S-shaped curves which would need specialist filters in FCP. Resolve is node based like Apple Color and has a mechanism to allow you to save your grades, which can be applied to other clips or re-use favourites in other projects. Nodes allow you to add a series of changes that form your grade – a bit like stacking filters in FCP – but you see helpful thumbnails of how each node is affecting the grade. You can also buy pre-made ‘looks’ as groups of nodes in a similar way to Magic Bullet Looks or GenArts Sapphire Edge plugins for FCP to give you a quick way to finish after primary grading. Shots from the same physical video file are also linked so that when you modify the grade on one shot, it is applied to all linked shots For secondary correction you may want to adjust only certain parts of your shot, based on the luminance levels (e.g. the sky) or based on the colour range of an object in the scene (e.g. a red jacket), without affecting the rest of the shot. These types of corrections can be achieved within FCP but take patience to select the correct colour and luma ranges that limit the effect of the change your making. You can stack several 3-way colour correction filters on a clip in FCP – one for your primary and then one or more for your secondary and use the ‘limit effect’ control to mask out part of the scene, but you can end up with a fairly horrible mask if your not careful. Resolve uses a Qualifier panels to select the hue, saturation and luma (HSL) ranges using an eyedropper tool and shows you an intuitive mask to see exactly what portions of your image you will be working on for the secondary correction. If you have objects that cannot be ‘keyed’ directly by their colour or luminance values, say you need to lighten only the face of a person in a shot, then you need to build a mask shape in FCP using a multi- point garbage matt or similar and then apply this to another layer of a duplicate clip before applying correction – all complexity that can easily go wrong. In Resolve you can use the windows palette to quickly build a suitable mask from ‘power’ shapes like circle, square, curve or custom shape – all of which can be combined into a single mask if needed, then adjusted as often as necessary to easily apply the grade to just the masked area. If your masked object moves in the frame over time, then the complexity increases, as you need to track the object so that the colour correction follows the movement. This is where Resolve comes into its own with a fantastic built in surface tracker similar to Mocha in After Effects that can automatically track moving objects. In FCP you would have to manually key-frame the mask or export via Motion or After Effects and do the mask tracking separately. With Davinci Resolve you get a lot of power for primary and secondary correction that makes it fairly painless to achieve good-looking results quickly. It’s certainly on my list of new tools as long as I can squeeze in an extra graphics card with lots of CUDA processing cores to make it work faster. Mark Brindle is a award winning filmmaker who runs a video production and kit rental company in north Devon. You can contact Mark via his website www.maniacfilms.com and you can learn more about digital filmmaking in his new Handbook available from Quercus press... Davinci Resolve colour panel showing the use of the HSL qualifier panel to create masks for secondary colour correction. TV-BAY MAGAZINE | 53 TV-BA073JAN13.indd 53 11/01/2013 14:17