To view this page ensure that Adobe Flash Player version 11.1.0 or greater is installed.

won’t stop me. Perhaps the next most significant challenge, and perhaps the toughest one at times, is finding new ways of telling a story. I always try to avoid the most straightforward and mainstream ways of shooting, to make sure everything I shoot is as fresh and original as possible. What are the most important pieces of kit you use, and why? It’s a cliche, but you can shoot a good movie with any camera really. That said, I love cameras that have that certain ‘je ne sais quoi’. I’m a big fan of full frame in particular, but I also like the ability to use unusual lenses, so a wide range of lens mounts is useful. The Sony F series probably best embodies what I want from a camera - relatively light, compact, full frame. The images look spectacular, and it doesn’t cost a million pounds but has the X factor. When working on a rope and in remote locations, light and compact is crucial. The other mainstay in camera gear is a GoPro. I haven’t used the Hero 3 yet, but the 2 goes everywhere with me. It still amazes me what these things are capable of. The next camera on my shopping list comes from the NX range of Handicams from Sony. I used the NX70 in Namibia for Driven to Despair and found it invaluable. It’s dust and shower proof, so with what I do for a living it’s a very handy piece of kit. Sometimes, when I’m in a situation where it’s too dangerous or time consuming to get the ‘main’ camera set up, an NXCAM is perfect for capturing the special moment that is vital to the story, the one that would have been missed otherwise. Getting the shot is more important than capturing it in 4K or with your favourite prime lens. I recently shot a short film (a Few Days in January) just using a Sony NX30 and captured some brilliant results with it. As with all cameras, it isn’t really the camera that makes the shot, it’s the light. I had mixed light whilst shooting this film and some of it certainly wasn’t ideal, but the footage that came out of the NX30 was very pleasing indeed. I’m sold, and I’ll be buying an NX30 or 70 to have with me at all time on my climbing harness, for shooting those all-important unique moments, the ones that you can’t afford to miss. Most hair-raising moment so far? The most hair-raising moments are not often the times on a rope or in the mountains, as you’re so focused on the job. They’re usually the times when you’re just about to set off and you realise what you are about to do. Once the camera is rolling, your head is in a different place.  Having said that, in the arctic a few years ago I’d walked up to the head of the Turner Glacier, at a point where it poured through a gap in the mountains, to shoot a time-lapse of the mountain range at sun set. I was sitting in amongst the crevasses where the ice was at its most turbulent, a little like sitting on a frozen rapid on a river. As the sun set and the temperature changed rapidly, the ice started to shift imperceptibly under my feet, but the noise was like cannon fire! I love the completely unexpected unique moments like that – they’re why I do what I do. Honestly, my scariest moments are showing my films on the big screen, especially at premieres - I’ll probably never get used to it.  (Ian’s full review of the Sony HXR- NX30E will appear in the June issue of TV-Bay) 68 | TV-BAY MAGAZINE TV-BAY075MAR13.indd 68 11/03/2013 16:52