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ON LOCATION Getting Back to Digital In 1992 the Barcelona Olympics used one of the fi rst fully digital 192 x192 intercom matrix in just 9RU (~15 inches). In digital intercom systems, panel and 4-wire audio is digitised using PCM audio and sent through a single, and sometimes redundant, digital crosspoint card where once there had been many such cards, one for each group of ports. The panel connections now often used co-axial video type cable to carry bi-directional AES audio with local power at the user panel. Every manufacturer’s design was more compact and more reliable with redundant switching and single crimped co-axial cables to the panels. By the new millennium almost all broadcast and large theatre matrix intercom systems were somewhat digital, with manufacturers in both the US and Europe providing systems based on proprietary or as with Riedel in Germany, AES3 router solutions. These matrix systems still had to connect to partyline wired systems and audio connected analogue wireless VHF and UHF systems, but there was a growing need to connect to Telco IT lines such as ISDN, T1 and even Audio/data modems. These allowed users to be remote not just by being in the next building but in the next country! Soon larger public broadcasters in Europe and the US were tying together all their production centres with one multi-frame networked intercom system over ISDN. These were highly nuanced and complex systems and the technology designed for data transport had to be teased to give reliable performance with voice. IP Technology 1994 started to see IP Telecommunication companies offering ubiquitous network solutions over Ethernet IP for telephony and data, and by 1997 most intercom manufactures had IP interfaces so that users in temporary news set-ups in hotel rooms could connect back to the production intercom systems in London or New York, or both over low-cost VPN lines. IP has enabled remote connections and ease of set-up within intercom to become the norm. PC, Mac or Smartphone applications can now provide ad-hoc client intercom ‘panels’ that can be downloaded and in use within minutes, complementing the more traditional digital intercom systems. Today, where once IP technology was on the periphery it is now found in the centre of modern communication systems. The next generation of intercom systems may exist wholly inside the IP domain offering easy to use, ad-hoc fl exibility with fully featured touchscreen technologies working alongside customers’ cellular devices in one big distributed network; and that’s not just blowing smoke. www.clearcom.com Drake Electronics matrix c. 1993 68 | KITPLUS - THE TV-BAY MAGAZINE: ISSUE 93 SEPTEMBER 2014