Kitplus Magazine by TV-BAY

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EDUCATION #TVFutures by Raechelle Jackson T he third year level of BSc Television and Broadcasting has become infamous. Students know it will be a hard year long before they join the level, and now I am in that position, I sense both the crackle of fear and anticipation. So if there is anybody reading this expecting to see comments about hating early lectures, or stories of debauched nights out, seriously, things have changed; we know what we want to do, and student fees are making us choose courses wisely. Specialist courses must produce students that are employable, and any student joining such a course will realise that it’s going to be an intensive education to help make that a possibility. My course has found a way to generate weekly live programme making for our professional TV channel via the curriculum. My course leader, Charlie Watts, is very keen to make sure all students have an opportunity to screen their work via the TV channel, otherwise all that hard work may never see the light of day after assessment. In May 2014 we celebrated the fi fth anniversary of our Creative and Cultural Industries (CCI) TV Channel, and as the new cohort of third years start the academic year, some of us will take over TV management roles from students now graduated and employed. Running a TV channel is punishingly hard, and the academic staff on the course realised very early on that more duties had to be entrusted to students. Over the years the TV student management team has grown in size - this year there are fi fteen TV managers, and we expect to help take the course to another level of achievement come May of next year. I am one of those students faced with the task of building on previous success, and I am fascinated by television management, and in particular programme scheduling. For me, taking on the role of a CCI Manager was something I’ve always looked towards since I fi rst knew about the position. I see scheduling as a hugely important factor within a television channel; using up to date equipment, liaising with staff and students and taking control of the output of the channel is essential. I’m determined to make the channel as varied as possible I also hope to combine this with several thematic days. For example I plan to schedule broadcasts that include projects in the community and environmental issues. Contribute with your experiences to #tvfutures 48 | KITPLUS - THE TV-BAY MAGAZINE: ISSUE 94 OCTOBER 2014 TV-BAY094OCT14 v118.indd 48 07/10/2014 15:39