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EDUCATION #TVFutures by Callum O’Leary L et’s be honest here, most students today are very engaged with social media, why wouldn’t they be? In the past few years, social media has developed hugely; not just as something you use as a pastime on your desktop or laptop, but a multi- million pound business. It’s where the people are. And where the people are is where the advertisers follow. Television has embraced social media as an area where users can interact, take part in competitions and so much more- and almost anything else goes. The big challenge though, is to get television, brands, social media and all of the gethered audiences working with each other in unison to create an experience that not only engages, but spreads by people sharing this content. This is what I am currently researching for my dissertation as a third year BSc Television and Broadcasting student at the University of Portsmouth. Specifi cally, I’m looking at the impact that sport broadcasts are having on Twitter and second screen culture. To do this, I will be using our University’s television channel CCI TV, which is managed by a student workforce. Over the next few months, I’ll be in charge of all the content that is put out through two of our social media platforms- Twitter and Vine. Professionally, this is a huge addition to my CV, as upon graduating , I will have had the experience of social media account management, which is an incredibly important emerging and expanding sector of television. The structure we have here is unusual for most universities, but it mimics professional practice. We have student management teams that look after the content and output of the channel from sport to marketing to outside broadcast managers- we effective help run the channel. 46 | KITPLUS - THE TV-BAY MAGAZINE: ISSUE 97 JANUARY 2015 If I look at my work so far, the journey has been interesting to say the least. I began the academic year working with Instagram and Facebook for CCITV, but after studying many of the resources I had, I realised that these two were not necessarily the best examples for my dissertation, so I requested to change my managerial position and start working with our Twitter and Vine accounts instead because these social networks are the focus of my research. It is important that my role at CCITV works in tandem with my dissertation because I’m doing what is known as a ‘combined’ study - whereby I study a particular subject and this is linked with something more practical which in turn provides fi rst hand research references for me. Contribute with your experiences to #tvfutures