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EDUCATION Society of Television Lighting and Design, Barry Cobden of the Institute of Production Sound, Martin Uren of BKSTS, Brian Rose from the Guild of Television Cameramen, and me representing the ITTP - and this is a good point to mention and give a big vote of thanks to Roz Morris who chaired the whole day, asking probing questions and keeping us from waffling on. Darren Long, Director of Sky Production Services says a lot about opinions in the industry. In the first panel session Andy Beale, Chief Engineer at BT Sport, was also urging us on. He was accompanied by John Herbert from Blackmagic, Steve Warner of the IABM and Chris Miller, camera supervisor on, amongst much else, Strictly Come Dancing and Mike Dugdale from the Camera Crew. The session was called “What the industry wants”. All together - “What do we want?” I hope that by the end of the day everyone knew. After that, coffee – and when one says coffee, one actually means the beginning of one of the important businesses of the day, which is networking. A chance, repeated through the day, for the educators and the employers to lobby each other. Just as in politics, the formal sessions are important to pass information and opinions and create the framework, but the actual business gets done with a drink and sandwich in hand. The next session, “Addressing the gaps”, carried the theme onwards into other areas of the business, with Matt Gallagher from thecallsheet.co.uk, film editor Stephen Haren and James Johnson of facilities house, Molinare. It isn’t just camera and sound crews who need educators to listen and adjust what they do to meet industry needs. Then the morning’s final session – time to put our money where our mouths are (not that we have any money - ITTP is a group of volunteers doing this because it needs to be done). Gathered on the stage were Iain Davidson from the Since the last conference, the big question for us has been – “ok, what are we going to do about it?”. We’ve come up with two things. The first is CPD – Continuing Professional Development. We aren’t the gods of TV who know all, but we know lots of people who are, and who also have the rather different ability to pass on their knowledge. So ITTP has already begun setting up sessions for those who train and teach, putting them together with the people working at the sharp end of the industry. The second thing was what this session was all about the “ITTP Approved Skills Scheme”. I joined in with the ITTP two years ago because it turned out that back then our leader Graham Reed and I both recently had a similar conversation with students involving mains leads and lights, with the same result - a blank look from a student. The Approved Skills Scheme addresses that sort of problem head on. What do we want newcomers to know when they start, what should we be able to take as given? Well, Ohm’s Law for a start. We asked the guilds and societies to tell us what they thought, so we could develop a list. This is what the session was about – the others were there to say that they supported the list, and I was there to present the scheme to the conference. We envisage that educators will use it to develop their curriculum content with the right material, and as things move on, we’ll be able to test that knowledge. This is really just re-inventing the wheel but this time for the TV industry, as many other professions, from accountants to plumbers, have been doing this for years. So the aim is that the ITTP approved scheme will offer the student a chance to develop qualifications in a variety of craft skills. This will ensure they will know they have learnt useful skills for their future and that the employers will know the practical abilities of each of their potential employees. Roz Morris, Bernard Newnham, Iain Davidson, Barry Cobden, Martin Uren and Brian Rose 44 | KITPLUS - TV-BAY MAGAZINE: ISSUE 98 FEBRUARY 2015