To view this page ensure that Adobe Flash Player version 11.1.0 or greater is installed.

than maintaining their valuable archives as old legacy tape formats sitting on shelves. It’s not only these antiquated tapes that need to be preserved, the technology to play them back is equally important. BBC S&PP continues to run a machine repair shop for VTRs and cameras, and offers its services to the open market. “When we digitise tapes for archive, it makes sense to keep everything as perfect as possible for that one last playout,” says Kevin Shaw Head of Technology and Restoration. “The critical point to remember is that, if an archive is on tape, you have to address this issue now. Every time a tape is played it is being worn, reducing its quality the next time it is played: tape has a very finite life. And, of course, it’s increasingly difficult to find players for the many tape formats we’ve seen over the 60 year life of video recording. Film is also fading away, and BBC S&PP naturally offers film digitisation and restoration too. However, whilst the demise of film is well publicised, it has a proven better longevity than tape. Ironic when many film assets were once transferred to video- tape for preservation. It is not just broadcasters and production companies who have audio-visual assets. Universities, charities and cultural organisations have collections which represent an important part of their heritage, which should be preserved because it will have value, in some way, in the future. As a result of investing in this software ourselves and offering archiving as a service, BBC S&PP DMS can provide customers with all the benefits of long-term archiving at a lower cost. The archive service is a popular added value for our many digitization clients because we can keep a disaster recovery instance in offline storage in case of problems with their own WIP storage”. KITPLUS - THE TV-BAY MAGAZINE: ISSUE 102 JUNE 2015 | 45