Kitplus - The TV-Bay Magazine

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EVENTS Soho shaking all over Manchester Alan Bradbury It was a busy time for my colleagues and I here at Soho Editors last month, but quite a telling one too. The relentless thrust northward of post-production, film, TV and broadcast services in the UK, saw us - and indeed many other companies - exhibiting at the Kitplus Show, hosted at the MediaCityUK complex at Salford Quays. For all of our presentations at the show, it was standing room only, with many more than had pre-registered for the sessions tipping up on spec. This is quite remarkable when one considers it really isn’t so long ago you would have been hard-pressed to find much interest at all in such an event outside the capital, let alone outside the W1 postcode. But not anymore; the Beeb’s move up to the North West has opened something of a floodgate. With this in mind, Soho Editors took its training expertise out on the road, showcasing how the latest incarnations of Final Cut Pro X, DaVinci Resolve, Motion 5, After Effects CC and Photoshop CC fare on the latest shiny Macs, whilst passing on a few tips and tricks into the bargain. Telling too, was the fact our presentations on Final Cut Pro X were so well attended. Those in the know are aware Apple’s convention-busting non-linear editor eschews a ‘make it look like the cockpit of the space shuttle’ interface in favour of a cleaner GUI; a GUI more suited to the younger generation of people coming into the industry who have grown up with iTunes and iMovie. FCP X is unlike more traditional layer-based NLEs, but having regularly trained people on quite a few NLEs - including FCP X - it came as no surprise to me to see that when people actually give FCP X a whirl at our presentations - in concert with some decent training in how to use it to best advantage - they overcame their initial resistance to the changes it heralds and ended up liking the direction it takes. FCP X may be different, and has shaken things up for sure, but it was also readily apparent from the numbers attending our presentations that it is now being taken seriously by the industry and gaining traction with a lot of people. Not to be outdone of course, Adobe are making continuing efforts to see their own NLE - Premiere Pro CC - taken equally seriously by industry pros, but rather than offer presentations of two rival NLEs at the show, we chose to give Adobe’s After Effects a showcase instead. It was equally evident from the numbers who pre-registered with us for that presentation - hosted by yours truly - that After Effects remains a favourite with people and garnered a lot of interest, particularly since it now comes bundled with a chopped-down version of Cinema 4D, which expands its camera tracking possibilities considerably. We’ve known for quite some time that 3D content is one of the new battlegrounds between rival post-production software developers, as evidenced by the 3D capabilities also grafted onto Final Cut Pro X. It’s also interesting to note that Blackmagic 36 | KITPLUS - THE TV-BAY MAGAZINE: ISSUE 108 DECEMBER 2015 are wading further into the post-production CGI software market with their new Fusion 8 offering; Apple are of course already in there with Motion 5, but one thing is for sure, the amount of choice we have for such post- production fun and games can only be a good thing as far as driving development of innovative software solutions is concerned. Like Apple’s FCP X, Blackmagic’s Fusion 8 shakes things up a bit where tradition is concerned too. As noted, when software breaks with conventions, it is understandable there will be some initial resistance, however, being stood at the back of Soho Editor’s presentation on Blackmagic’s Resolve - ably handled by my work college Rory Cantwell - it was apparent Resolve’s node- based GUI, whilst initially a little puzzling to people when they first see it, very soon begins to make a lot of sense. Interesting too that Blackmagic, like Soho Editors, is yet another