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EDUCATION Media acquisition & archive workflow Ryan Jenkins Hello, I am Ryan Jenkins, a third year student at the University of Portsmouth and as part of my final year on the BSc Television and Broadcasting course, I am the Post Production manager for all television teams making live programmes, something we specialise in. My role has thus far seen me design a workflow that involves archiving footage from our made VT’s, and then storing them for future use for cutaways and other archival reasons. Here is a little of something that I have learnt in my attempt to create a fully operable archive system - I hope it will improve how we work. I found out quite quickly when creating a new archive workflow that there are many different issues to consider; delivery of material to the archive, how much of the project needs archiving and what you are going to use as the main storage device. Those of you involved with archiving will know all too well that the issue of how to get material to the archive can be as simple as using a portable hard drive, but this is only ideal for small projects as they can take a while to read/write. Another thing to look at could be a portable solid state drive, faster than an HDD but more expensive for the same storage space. However I discovered that all of these solutions have one major issue - they have to be transported from one place to another. Depending on where you decide to have your archive it could be as close as the next room, but if you were a large company with many post houses and an archive center travelling from one to another can be a costly task. With the use of a drop box system networked from all post houses to the archive center it can be a quick and easy process. The next issue is what to store, and I have asked myself if there is any need to archive all of the rushes for a project or could the final export be fine. Each project will be different in this respect, clients may ask for different things. Whilst at the point of archive it may seem better to archive everything to do with a project, 34 | KITPLUS - THE TV-BAY MAGAZINE: ISSUE 109 JANUARY 2016 especially when starting an archive and seeing all of the storage space. One thing students tend to forget is that storage space will fill up quickly, and the more storage space needed, the more money is required in order to acquire more. Having a system in place that is easy to identify is what is required and ensuring you only archive the necessities saves money and time during the archiving and retrieval process. I found that it doesn’t stop there! Another decision that needs to be made is what kit and methods are you going to invest in? HDDs have a fairly high failure rate which increases rapidly once they reach the four year mark. Now this does not sound like the best way in which to securely store media for future use. I figured it was best to use an LTO system, LTO6 tapes have 2.5TB worth of storage, where a HDD would cost in the region of £50 for 6TB an LTO6 tape would only cost £25. Although if you were to compress the data on the LTO6 tape you can push for 6.25TB. A great saving to be had, however there are additional peripherals needed, LTO tapes can not be put straight into the computer like a HDD. This opened my eyes to the possibility of using an LTO tapes in the archiving process, especially within the university environment having constantly created work being stored on HDDs that are expensive and fail quicker. I learnt that it is definitely worth storing this media on an LTO tape from the perspective of a student solely on the price of storage.