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“There are several scenes, particularly in the Wegener’s flat, that come very close to our reference,” he continues. “For example, at one point Einar is dressed as Lili and sitting on a table in the flat crying, and you see a POV wide shot of Gerda looking at her that’s almost identical to a well known Hammershøi painting. Of course, as a colorist, you are often given photographic or illustrated references, but they are usually only tools to give you a general idea of the mood you need to create. It’s not normally as specific as ‘The Danish Girl.’” Though the results were impressive, matching the Hammershøi paintings’ unique palette to the final grade was one of the biggest challenges Glasman faced throughout his work on the feature. “It’s interesting because it’s been my experience that sometimes more subtle grades, like the one for the Wegener’s flat, are actually more difficult to achieve than the bolder ones. The DaVinci Resolve toolset was a great help in this process,” says Glasman, who explains that the usual pipeline at Goldcrest Post London involves using Resolve from start to finish, including conforming directly within Resolve and even some visual effects work. “To achieve the Hammershøi look, we began by using a lookup table that had a great filmic feel to it, and then applied varying tone curve adjustments to give the soft, painterly result. We then decided to go for a bolder look when Lili and Gerda move to live a much less austere life in Paris. Compared to our grading work in Copenhagen, Paris is more colorful and really emphasizes the two different worlds, and lives, the characters are leading.” Mastering Skin Tones Another challenge for Glasman with “The Danish Girl” was making sure all the skin tones looked correct. “Though actress Alicia Vikander, who plays Gerda, is Scandinavian, she is actually very olive skinned and was quite sun tanned on this film,” says Glasman. “This clashed with Eddie Redmayne, who is very pale, with an almost blue skin tone in comparison. We did a lot of work to equalize their skin tones and minimize that difference.” Further skin grading work was needed towards the end of the film, when Lili decides to undergo several dangerous new sex reassignment surgeries to gain female anatomy for good. “For this, we needed to make Redmayne look quite sick as the storyline develops, but without ever going over doing it or he would have looked like a cadaver,” Glasman adds. “To create this effect, we first keyed his skin to isolate it from the rest of the image, then desaturated it. Next, I used Resolve’s rotoscoping, tracking and grading tools to create some shadowing across his face, particularly under his eyes.” “The grade for ‘The Danish Girl’ was tricky to achieve,” Glasman concludes, “but with the help of Resolve we were able to really bring everything together.” 0 O FF - GET KE £ YS 1 .COM W OUT N WW O W.EDITORS ck o u t 9 a t che VB E N TE R : T Our rst WIRELESS video editing keyboards. Available for Avid, Premiere, Sony Vegas, EDIUS and more OTHER PRODUCTS USB MICROPHONES £69. 99 Portable vocal booths wireless headphones KITPLUS - THE TV-BAY MAGAZINE: ISSUE 112 APRIL 2016 | 67