KitPlus - The TV-Bay Magazine

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A DAY IN THE LIFE Photo: Michael Bermel SHOOTING THE WRC RALLY CONTINUED You get a couple of minutes for the dust to settle if you’re lucky. The starts are every two minutes. You have one chance to get the shot. After the twenty or so cars pass, the recorded memory cards are handed to a motor cycle courier who rushes them back to HQ for the edit of that day’s programme. We drive about 20 km to set up for the afternoon session. This time I had a bit more warning by way of a helicopter tracking the cars – I could see it coming into shot before the car came over the crest of the hill. With Polecam, I could swing out, develop the shot, follow the car entering the hairpin and then blasting away in a cloud of dust and stones. By the time we pack up and drive back it’s 9pm. We grab some food, get the batteries on charge, and clean all the kit ready for the next day. On the Sunday a 6am start again. We drove to the live stage start, then along the rally track for about 2km, through the hills and down towards the sea; a beautiful location; the camera position was the inside of a hairpin. I rigged Polecam using 4 carbon fibre sections so I could provide a long sweeping shot and operate back from the edge of the track. We connected the camera and the audio output to a fibre box and sent the signal a couple of kilometres to the OB unit. 64 | KITPLUS - THE TV-BAY MAGAZINE: ISSUE 116 AUGUST 2016 Now we had talkback so I could hear when each car started the stage, how many seconds to when they reached camera 2; I was camera 3, so I could line up the shot and prepare for the arrival of the four wheel drive missile. THE FIRST CAR COMES INTO SHOT AND THE DIRECTOR CALLS MY CAMERA. I start the move high, show the track and the car rounding the previous corner, then speed up the move and drop down low to fill the frame with the car and driver fighting its way around the hairpin just a few metres away; I continue to follow the car around as it blasts its way towards the next camera position. Five seconds later the slipstream covers us in dust that lasts for a good thirty seconds. Quickly I have to clean the lens and dust down the equipment as best as I can as the next car is about to start the stage. A couple of hours later we’ve set up to shoot the final stage and the cars are coming thick and really fast – the dust and dirt is just unbelievable but the Polecam controls and remote head and all the kit keeps on performing perfectly despite the extremely hostile conditions. By Mark Sallaway - Now available with 2 polecam rigs, 4k and Hi-speed cameras plus a wealth of experience - who knows where the next location will be? - hopefully somewhere without too much dust!