KitPlus - The TV-Bay Magazine

To view this page ensure that Adobe Flash Player version 11.1.0 or greater is installed.

EDUCATION DECIDING TO DO THINGS OUTSIDE OF THE FIXED CURRICULUM. Emma Benson I was worried that the experience could change my career path... If you’re wondering whether or not to do some extracurricular work outside of your timetabled course, the answer should always be yes. The more you further your experience and skills the brighter your future will look. As a third year student, studying Television and Broadcasting, I’m lucky enough to have hands on experience with filming equipment, on location shoots and different types of editing software, such as Avid and Adobe Premiere Pro. It was because of this I put myself out in the ‘professional world’ to see what the difference in experience from student to professional would really be. I believe gaining any experience outside of my timetable is very beneficial to my future, it helps me gain knowledge and experience of the real world while having a safety net of my course behind me. Through first and second year of my course I have taken part in extra filming sessions and have helped out on induction days, to practice with different types of filming equipment. I was also a runner at the Victorian Christmas Festival in Portsmouth Dockyard, and learnt a lot about physically building and dressing sets for performances. The size and length of this extracurricular work doesn’t matter, so long as I can keep learning and furthering myself for a future in the television industry. I decided that after my second year at university I would try a year placement, which unfortunately didn’t work out as planned. So I then started applying for as many short internship and running jobs as possible for over the summer. Fortunately most film and television companies are based in and around London, which came in handy as I only live a short 28 | KITPLUS - THE TV-BAY MAGAZINE: ISSUE 121 January 2017 distance outside of London itself. This meant I could apply to all the big and small opportunities in London as well. Finding and applying to professional jobs in my chosen industry was a very daunting task. However, the fearful part of me made sure I was ready for anything that got thrown at me in the interviews and put me in the mindset to succeed, even if it meant detailed research of each company. After applying to countless opportunities and being turned down a few times, with some just not responding, I started to lose heart. It was then that I got a surprising email advertising paid internship within the Institute of Fundraising, with the Remember A Charity team in London. I didn’t see any harm in applying to it, even if it was a little out of my league in terms of skills. At first I thought my internship was going to be extremely hard and wondered if I could live up to ‘professional standards’ of the real work place. I expected a huge amount of pressure and stress to hit particular deadlines, and to create high enough quality content for them to recognise me as something other than a student; it’s one thing to try and meet professional standards, it’s a whole other thing when it’s simply expected and required. I was worried that the experience could change what career path I wanted to persue, where I want to work, and if everything I learnt could only be applied when filming a live TV show. In addition to this, I wanted professional experience where I didn’t have a safety net ready and waiting to correct any mistakes. It was terrifying at first, but ended up being such a reassuring experience that really boosted my confidence in my skill set.