KitPlus - The TV-Bay Magazine

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POST PRODUCTION Dick Hobbs DICK HOBBS TALKS TO MA XINE GERVAIS GRADING A MIRACLE We all know the story. On 15 January 2009 an Airbus A320 took off from LaGuardia airport in New York, heading for Charlotte. Just a couple of minutes later the plane flew through a flock of Canada geese and blew out both engines. Knowing the risk of crashing into heavily populated areas, Captain Chesley Sullenberger – Sully – aimed for the only long flat surface he could see: the Hudson River. The story of the “miracle on the Hudson” is now a dramatic new movie, Sully, directed by Clint Eastwood and starring Tom Hanks as the hero pilot. To find out how they captured the look of the film, Dick Hobbs talked to Maxine Gervais, senior colorist at Technicolor in Los Angeles. Maxine Gervais uses a Baselight grading system from FilmLight. On a technical level this gives her the power to grade from the full resolution camera output, de-Bayering the raw data and converting to 4K resolution in real time. She was involved in the project all the way from dailies to final deliverables. “The benefit of grading the dailies is that from early on you get to discuss what they’re going for, how things are being shot, and how things are coming to you,” Gervais said. An early decision was that the movie should be shot and finished for IMAX, with other deliverables derived from that. In turn, that meant very high resolution acquisition. Director of photography Tom Stern used an Arri Alexa 65 in its full raw 6.5K resolution. With DoP Tom Stern and director Clint Eastwood also in on the dailies, she quickly learnt what they were aiming for. With the Baselight non-destructive workflow, grading decisions made on the dailies informed the process all the way down to final deliverables, without burning in any decisions. “You can already establish a little bit of that aesthetic, so when we go to the DI we were already in a good place. It’s all been done on Baselight, so you can build from there.” “Based on the pristine resolution, detail and sharpness, we decided that the most efficient approach was to record the full 6.5K resolution from the camera and grade from the raw data,” Gervais explained. “We knew the take-off, the collision with the flock of birds and that remarkable water landing would be gripping in IMAX.” Inevitably, visual effects play a big part in the movie. All effects (created by MPC) were delivered in 4K, with some scenes having eight element mattes to separate the plane, the water, the New York city skyline and more. Again, Baselight allowed Gervais to grade these elements separately, rendering the whole scene in real time. 50 | KITPLUS - THE TV-BAY MAGAZINE: ISSUE 121 January 2017